What Powers Can I Authorize Under a Durable Power of Attorney?

A durable and general power of attorney is an important document that should be at the cornerstone of your estate planning. A power of attorney is most effective in the event of incapacity, such as an illness or event that renders you unable to make decisions or take certain actions on your own. You can decide what works best for your situation and then discussing setting your POA up that way with your lawyer.

A durable general power of attorney authorizes a person to act in a wide range of business and legal matters, which will stay in effect even if you are incapacitated. You can decide that your general POA becomes effective only if you are incapacitated or it becomes effective immediately upon the signing of the document.

The person that you appoint as your attorney in fact or agent can handle many types of transactions on your behalf, including filing tax returns, selling and buying property, managing bank accounts and applying for government benefits. Without a general durable power of attorney in your estate planning document set, your family might need to go to court to request that you be declared incompetent so that a person can take care of your finances for you.

It’s important to recognize that a general durable power of attorney is not the same thing as a durable healthcare power of attorney. You’ll need to sit down with an estate planning lawyer to discuss some of the distinctions between various types of power of attorney documents and which of these are most appropriate for your individual situation.

Need help with your POA assignment in New Hampshire or Maine? Discuss your options by contacting our firm today.

 

 

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